questions

Getting to Answers Without Questions. Really?

Are questions better than statements?

Of course, the “right” answer is “yes.” Which is precisely the challenge of asking questions: We think we already know the answer. I admit it. I often do.

When I do, my arrogance spews observations as judgements (This can be especially true with family or others close to me. Ugh.). My narrow-mindedness is expressed as nothing more than biting accusation dressed up as "truth-telling." And my claim to “truth” leads me to directives and corrections with little room for push-back or open human-to-human dialog. This confession is no fun.

Surely I'm not alone in this. 

Look at your own relationships and interactions. In how many conversations - in your workplace, on your team, in your church, in your home - do you actually ask questions? Meaningful questions. Too often our dialogs are a back-and-forth exchange of statements we already share with each other. We craft questions to draw out…

Honest in Church?

Church is too often the most risky place to be spiritually honest. - Peter Enns

It's a challenging statement. And yet, most of us know exactly what it means. Of course, we are complex beings, thoroughly connected: body, mind, spirit. So being spiritually honest can be as difficult to as revealing our mental illness, our emotional insecurities, our addictions.

How does this risk exist in too many churches? What contributes to our mask-wearing? Perhaps some of the following are true...

  • Do we expect only joy should be expressed in corporate worship?
  • Do we say "how are you?" with any intention of hearing what's true - regardless?
  • Do we believe that Christ-followers should never feel depression, anxiety or suicidal ideation?
  • Do we value closure and convincing over journey and process?
  • Are we afraid our question of faith...