discipleship

Discipleship as Story: A Shared Journey of What It Is to Be Fully Human

I’ve been to India twice now. On both occasions I took in a trip to Agra to visit the Red Fort and the famed Taj Mahal. I was traveling with my family on the second tour and wanted them to experience all I had in my first Eastern adventure. 

You see, my first tour was with a native travel guide who completely immersed herself in the history and legacy of her country. She told stories about the people and events that had inhabited the sites as though she had experienced them herself. She was connected with the story. She told it as if it was her own. I listened with keen interest, hung on every word. I was invited into her world, her history, her life. I not felt I knew her country and her heritage; I believed I knew her. 

Eager for my wife and daughter to experience the same riveting interaction, we embarked on the two-hour ride to Agra from New Deli. My eagerness waned as…

Discipleship & the Story of Two Sons

We're weeks away from launching a new disciple-making initiative at Granger Community Church. We're ramping up for a life-long journey of new normal, not merely a three-semester classroom of teaching. We're currently training guides who'll journey with others, extending grace, understanding, and encouragement. 

I helped with the training last week and my assistant, Julie, reminded me of the story of "the Prodigal Son" (as we church peeps tend to call it). It's a beautiful and challenging picture that helps us in our role of guiding, helping, coaching others with whom we journey.  

I had a college professor who taught that the parables of Jesus had one and one point only. It was wrong to try to read too much into the details of Jesus' stories. Take the ever-popular story of "the prodigal son". Point: God the Father is a forgiving, unconditional loving God. According to my prof, the story's elder son character was merely added in to round out a great story. I think he may have missed a point or two in the parable.

Original Sin vs. Original Grace | Part 3

I began this article a couple days ago, so if you're just tuning in, you may want to read Part 2 and Part 1 first (I'd start with Part 1).

Growth is process for all of us. Just look around you. It's spring; time for new birth. Blind, helpless birds wait open-mouthed for mama to provide food. Ducklings waddle in mass, following eagerly, learning to find food. Nature's newborn are immature. 

We're no different.

If we’re willing to honestly reflect on the incremental nature of our growth, we’ll have to admit that it’s taken a very long time to really accept and practice some areas of “next steps” that we’ve known cognitively for…well, a long time. If we’re honest, we’ll learn more tomorrow, next month, next year and the year after that. We’re not yet who we’re going to be.

When we’re honest about our own experiences, we realize