best practices

It’s in You. And Your Team. Let’s Access It.

You know it’s good - your leadership, your team, your work, your life - but, there’s a gnawing sense that it could be better. More focused. More replenishing. More you.

I only have a few spots left

Volunteer Owned Best Practices...by Email

Excellent guest service - whether in a local church, community non-profit, retail business or service industry - is really the compilation of lived-out best practices. Those benchmark behaviors that may be simple and common sense, but they are set as standards of practice by everyone in the organization.

Best practices can be produced in a board room. 

  • Respond to questions within 48 hours. 
  • Answer the phone before the fourth ring. 
  • Do what you do with excellence. 

It can happen: best practices can come from the board room. But not most of them.

Most best practices come about in the moment. A one-time occurrence implemented by one team member that gets discovered and, because of its impact on communicating value, is repeated as a norm throughout the entire team. That’s what happened with

Can the Script. Netflix Did.

You can always tell when the script is being used. You know what I mean. You're engaged in lively conversation over a meal and your server interrupts with the scripted dessert monologue. Or your talking with customer service on the phone and you don't feel heard at all, because the same script is repeated over and over regardless what you say. 

I hate the script. It's annoying and sad. Annoying, because

Guest Services | The Basics

I've been asked lately about some bottom-line "musts" to establish and/or take guest services excellence to the next level. This isn't an exhaustive list (that's why I wrote a few books on the topic), but these core essentials will provide a foundation to make your serve to guests excellent and personable.

To Tag or Not to Tag

I just received a question from Kyle - a friend who serves at a neighboring church in our area. 

Do our greeters wear name tags or only those serving at our Guest Services center? 

I've had dozens of conversations with churches asking a similar question, but much to my own surprise, I don't think I've addressed it in writing 'til now. Thanks for the prompt, Kyle! 

To Tag or Not to Tag

At Granger Community we want to remove all the barriers we can

Does Our "Good" Prevent "Better?"

Seth Godin recently wrote about competence and possibility. His comments are provocative:

As we get more experienced, we get better, more competent, more able to do our thing.

And it's easy to fall in love with that competence, to appreciate it and protect it. The pitfall? We close ourselves off from possibility.

Possibility, innovation, art--these are endeavors that not only bring the whiff of failure, they also require us to do something we're not proven to be good at. After all, if we were so good at it that the outcome was assured, there'd be no sense of possibility.

He wraps up his short article with this: